15 MOST INNOVATIVE AD CAMPAIGNS OF 2015

 

GenWowAwards-2015Call them "The Fab 15"—fifteen of the most innovative advertising initiatives of 2015.

That is, fifteen that aren't otherwise captured in our "10 Best" lists in Mobile Marketing, Social Media, Augmented Reality, Virtual Reality, Brand Pranks and Brand Viral Videos.

Fifteen that, it's worth noting, feature mostly—though not exclusively—physical-world experiences that do not require consumers to interface with mobile devices.

And fifteen out of countless other notable efforts worth celebrating this year.

But hey, fifteen had a good ring to it.

Plus it's our list, so we're picking favorites—and we think you'll dig them, too.

15. LOWE'S: 'HOW-TO' WINDOW DISPLAYS

The home improvement retailer brings 3D, stop-motion style versions of its popular "Fix it in Six" series of "how-to" Vine videos to store window displays, complete with "Like" buttons. We do.

14. SPP: 'EARTH 2045'

What do you want the world to be like when you retire? This Swedish pension firm created this interactive experience that enables you to toggle two versions of life 30 years from now to show how sustainability pays off—for the planet and your financial picture.

13. CANNON: SMART BILLBOARDS

These intelligent digital billboards pull in data gathered from social media, traffic updates and weather information to provide tips on getting the best photos to New York City tourists and amateur photographers.

12. COCA-COLA: 'WISH IN A BOTTLE'

Next year we may have to dedicate a "Best of" list to drone-vertising. Until then, crack open a bottle of Coca-Cola, and share some happiness as these drones shoot fireworks to light up the night sky.

11. BURBERRY: CUSTOMIZABLE SCARVES

Digital signs developed with DreamWorks Animation enables shoppers at Piccadilly Circus to use their mobile phones to personalize and visualize custom scarves, and display them on a giant screen for all to see before placing a purchase.

10. MARKETING EVOLUTION: 'MONICA'

Online media planning and optimization solutions provider Marketing Evolution developed this robot that was able to identify attendees at this year’s Association of National Advertisers conference on sight – and engage in conversation about their media plans based on their past spend.

9. REACH FOR CHANGE: 'NEVER-ENDING STORY' DREAM-POWERED SITE

Cult '80s film 'Never-ending Story' inspires this site, which is “powered' by dream data” from five sleeping volunteers in a very abstract effort to highlight this non-profit organization’s efforts to improve the lives of children.

8. LEXUS: 'ORIGAMI LEXUS'

It’s 3D printed car. Made out of cardboard. That you can drive. Need we say more?

7. NETHERLANDS NUTRITION CENTRE: 'LIVING BILLBOARDS'

Five different living billboards featured encasements with live bacteria on affixed strips to keep them in place. Over time, the bacteria fed off the environment inside the encasements, and started go grow, forming one of five unique statements to educate consumers about how to avoid becoming ill due to household bacteria. So creepy, it’s (literally) infectious.

6. IF INSURANCE: 'SLOW DOWN GPS' APP

You either love the voice that comes out of your GPS navigation device, or hate it. Either way, this app automatically switches to a child’s voice when providing turn-by-turn instructions through areas where there are likely to be kids around, in an effort to cue drivers to drive more cautiously.

5. POST-IT: A BANNER AD YOU'LL ACTUALLY LOVE

It’s (almost) enough to make you love retargeting: This year, online display ads for 3M's Post-It brand sticky notes have proven just that—sticky—by enabling consumers to write themselves notes, reminders and to-do lists right inside the ad units. Through the magic of retargeting—technologies that deliver that same ad to you wherever you go around the Internets, usually to your chagrin—your virtual Post-Its re-appear everywhere you go.

4. NETFLIX: 'BRAINWAVE SYMPHONY'

This summer, Netflix came up with an innovative way to promote its 'Sense8' online series, which about eight random people who find themselves connected telepathically. It’s approach? Using brainwaves from eight viewers to create a musical symphony.

3. VERIZON: MINECRAFT IN-GAME MOBILE PHONE

What easier (or, at least cooler) way to take selfies and order real-world pizza while you’re playing Minecraft?

2. KAGULA: ROVING PRICE TRUCK

Out to demonstrate how quick and transparent its auto price evaluations are, Taiwan-based used car dealer Kagulu rolled out a truck outfitted with cameras and databases to scans cars on the streets and display its value instantly.

1. CLEANUP HONG KONG: 'THE FACE OF LITTER'

Call it "23AndThee": This past Earth Day, Hong Kong-based NGO Cleanup launched a billboard and bus signage campaign in an effort to get people to clean up after themselves in city known for more than its share of litter. DNA evidence on discarded chewing gum, cigarette butts and even a condom was used to by forensic scientists to predict the eye, hair and skin color, as well as the face shape, of litters – and a total of 27 different profiles were established, and then displayed for all to see. Nothing like shame—and the fear of it—to shape behavior!

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TOP 10 BEST MOBILE MARKETING CAMPAIGNS 2015 (VIDEO)

 

GenWowAwards-2015

Mobile is where it’s at again this year, though we quibble with its definition these days.

For instance, Facebook says nearly 80% of its ad revenue come from mobile advertising. But in our humble opinion, just because an ad is experienced on a mobile device doesn’t mean it’s “mobile.”

Small wonder then, that as in year’s past, most of our top pics for 2015 bring something more to “mobile” – by in fact, relating to place, or the specific capabilities or key functionality of the device in which they are consumed.

Here's 10 of our favorites from the year that was.

10. JOHN LEWIS: MAN ON THE MOON

This wildly popular (and widely spoofed) holiday campaign from UK retailer John Lewis includes a mobile app featuring augmented reality that lets you point your phone toward the moon to unlock daily facts about each phase of the moon. There’s also a game in which the player has to avoid obstacles and collect power boosts to get a specific item up to the man on the moon.

9. COKE ZERO: "DRINKABLE ADVERTISING"

Despite the fact that we're never ones to require any additional prompting to drink Coke Zero – we live on the stuff – this year’s “drinkable advertising” caught our notice. The campaign’s TV spots featured Coke Zero being poured from an onscreen bottle – before migrating to viewers’ mobile phone screens before transmogrifying into a coupon.

8. WWF: #THELASTSELFIE

What’s not to love about the World Wild Life Fund’s “Last Selfie” promotion with Snapchat, which takes advantage of the fleeting, transient nature of Snapchat snaps with short ads that show just how quickly an endangered species can be wiped off the planet. Powerful, and perfect for the platform. In just its first week, consumers posted 40,000 tweets about the initiatives to 120 million timelines. And in just three days, WWF reached its fundraising target for the entire month.

7. GUESS: VIRTUAL SUNGLASSES

This year, Guess's special mobile ad units enabled users to snap selfies and then “try on” sunglasses via augmented reality, complete with pointers on which styles work best for your face shape. The user takes or uploads a selfie, adjusts the placement, applies from a wide selection of sunglasses and can even share the image for feedback from far-flung friends via their social platforms. Add a "buy" button and this could be m-commerce magic instead of just promotion.

6. TOYS 'R US: IN-STORE MOBILE AR

How do you get shoppers into store locations during the Easter season? Launch an augmented reality Egg Hunt for the chance to win store gift cards. Here’s a brick & mortar retailer (in Australia) that refused to shy away from mobile and instead embraced it to enhance the retail experience.

5. SPOTIFY: #FOUNDTHEMFIRST

This summer, the online music streaming service rolled out a "Found Them First" microsite that lets users see which musicians the system knows they heard before the artists became megawatt sensations. Users can then build and share a playlist built on those early discoveries. In exchange, Spotify will offer them a new playlist with other new acts they might help “discover” as well.

4. MINI USA: 'BACKWATER' & 'REAL MEMORIES'

MINI USA is big on short online films featuring its cars, so it made since that the brand would be among the first to take 360-degree video for a test drive. Two such films, “Backwater” and “Real Memories” are definitely worth a gander—and could mean big things for the road ahead.

3. SNICKERS 'HUNGER BAR'

Let’s face it: You’re not quite you when you’re hungry, are you? Which is why the latest installment of Snickers’ long-running "You're Not You" campaign includes a mobile app that enables consumers to create images related to their particular hunger symptoms and share them socially. The key isn’t to show off what kind of hungry you are, of course. It’s about calling out family and friends for acting “snippy,” “loopy,” “cranky,” “confused,” “spacey," or ... insert your own adjective here.

2. QANTAS: ‘VIRTUAL DESTINATIONS’

Yes, I’m still fixated on this VR initiative from Qantas, which enables you to go on a eight-minute, 360-degree virtual vacation to Hamilton Island. In fact, it was really hard to decide between this and our #1 pick this year. It is, after all, either instant justification for the VRevolution, or a sure sign of the Apocalypse. Once companies start producing VR content like this that lasts not minutes but for hours on end, the human race may just opt out of the “reality” part of the equation all together—at least when they aren’t physically going to these amazing locales.

1. PIZZA HUT: ‘PIZZA BOX PROJECTOR’

Okay, there's rarely a moment when a large TV screen is much out of arms reach these days. So maybe this is the solution to a problem that few will ever face. But it's still hard not to dig the Pizza Hut Blockbuster Box - a pizza box that's also a movie projector. Throw in a cold one and this could be the best thing to happen to pizza since pepperoni.

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Top 10 Best Augmented Reality Campaigns 2015

GenWowAwards-2015Even Marty McFly knew augmented reality would be big this year.

As 1989’s "Back to the Future II" showed us, 2015 would find Live AR movie promotions for "Jaws 19" and teens and adults using AR-enabled goggles along the lines of Google Glass (if Google Glass looked like Google Cardboard).

Of course, with all the excitement around Oculus Rift and the aforementioned Cardboard, one could be forgiven for wondering if this is the year virtual reality (or VR, immersive experiences within virtual environments) overshadowed AR (which layers virtual elements over the physical world in front of you in what has been called "The Internet on Things).

It doesn’t help that there has indeed seemed to be a dearth of truly cool AR marketing initiatives this year, at least compared to 2014 and 2013.

But that doesn’t mean there weren’t some brands doing their best to capitalize on an emerging technology expected to eclipse VR with $120 billion of the total $150 billion AR/VR market by 2020, according to a recent report from Manatt Digital Media.

Among the more positive trends this year: A move beyond (just) promotional eye candy to showroom and retail sales tools and apps, as well as AR-enhanced commerce.

As AR ramps up for what will hopefully be a more promising year ahead, let's take a look at some of our favorites in AR-enabled marketing and advertising from 2015—at least so far—below.

What made your list? And what AR campaigns would you add to ours? Do share!

2015 TOP 10 BEST: AUGMENTED REALITY

10. AZEK: AR HOME IMPROVEMENT IPAD APP

 

What Ikea long ago started doing for interiors, exterior building products maker AZEK is doing for dealers and contractors trying to help clients make decisions for their home improvement projects. The AR Home Improvement App offers the ability to show prospects and customers how new pavers, patio finishes, porches, railings, and light fixtures will look when in situ (albeit on a representative home, not their own), save the visual, and even share it via social media. Built by Marxent Labs, the app is in use by 75% of all AZEK resellers, with 1,000 new downloads per month. Now that’s something to write home about.

9. MANOR PLUS: AR CATALOG

Also making a nod to Ikea's catalog playbook: Zurich’s Manor Plus Summer 2015 catalog, which featured AR elements that helped its merchandising come to life.

8. TOYS 'R US: 'TRUE MAGIC IN-STORE AR

 

How do you get shoppers into store locations during the Easter season? Launch an AR Egg Hunt for the chance to win store gift cards. Here’s a brick & mortar retailer that refused to shy away from mobile and instead embraced it to enhance the retail experience.

7. MICROSOFT HALOLENS: 'TRANSFORM YOUR WORLD'

 

Okay, this is cheating, since HoloLens isn’t even out yet. But it perfectly captures the value proposition for augmented reality. And it happens to top ADWEEK’s branded video charts just now. When I wrote about the future of augmented reality in my second book, THE ON-DEMAND BRAND, this is definitely the kind of thing I envisioned. Be sure to check out this gaming demo as well.

6. MINI USA: 'AR VISION'

 

We’re cheating again here, too, as this is conceptual marketing from MINI. Called Augmented Vision, this wearable AR concept will hypothetically be tied to the MINI Connected Infotainment platform, to “enhance the driving experience by seamlessly interconnecting applications inside and outside the vehicle while providing the driver with greater vision and increased safety.” Unlike the HoloLens demo, which is for an actual product, this concept is, as far as we know, still very much in development at BMW’s lab in Mountain View, California.

5. LEXUS & FERRARI SHOWROOM AR

 

Lexus has done some very cool work with augmented reality in years past. And Ferrari is, well, Ferrari. But a trend to note here is that, like Azek in its own category, these celebrated upscale to uber-luxury brands are now moving beyond AR promotions to include useful support tools sales people can use to give clientele a closer look at upcoming cars and to showcase automobile innovation. On another end of the automobile spectrum, look also at Hyundai’s new Virtual Owner’s Guide, which is designed for customers as part of the actual brand experience.

 

4. JOHN LEWIS: 'MAN ON THE MOON' AR APP

 

This Christmas TV spot from UK retailer John Lewis is going to instantly get you in the spirit of the season. It’s already the early favorite of the Holiday ad season internationally, inspiring a perhaps inevitable ‘Star Wars’ parody. And it also has its own mobile app, which includes, among other things, an AR feature that lets you hold your phone to the moon to view interesting factoids, or at John Lewis in-store posters and shopping bags to unlock free downloads at the retailer’s site.

3. UNIVERSAL STUDIOS: 'FURIOUS 7' LIVE AR DISPLAY

 

In the vein of great mobile AR apps like the special effects app from JJ Abrams’ production company Bad Robot, this live AR display enables you to watch yourself get killed by a falling car in front of friends and perfect strangers at the mall. Morbid as it may seem, it’d be hard for the target audience for the latest installment of the mega hit ‘Fast & Furious’ franchise to ignore. Kind of makes you wonder what a similar AR promotion for ‘San Andreas’ might have been like.

2. MICROSOFT: 'SUNSET OVERDRIVE' BUS SHELTERS

 

The whole AR-enabled bus shelter has been done before, but it still can’t help but draw you in—especially when it involves mutant monsters coming your way on the street in front of you. Still, as cool as this promo for the new Xbox game ‘Sunset Overdrive’ looks, the Overcharge Delirium XT energy drink it features sounds like it may be even more tempting than the game itself.

1.  SNICKERS: 'HUNGER BAR'

 

You’re not quite you when you’re hungry, are you? Which is why Snickers rolled out this new installment of its long-running "You're Not You" campaign, which includes a mobile app that enables consumers to create images related to their particular hunger symptoms and share them socially. The key isn’t to show off what kind of hungry you are, of course, but in calling out family and friends for acting “snippy,” “loopy,” “cranky,” “confused,” “spacey," or ... insert your own adjective here.

BONUS CAMPAIGN: SEAGATE 'HOLIDAY SMOOCH BOOTH'

Seagate_holiday_smooch

In the same vein as the Snickers ‘Hunger Bar’ campaign, this Holiday 2015 promotion from storage solutions provider Seagate enables you to snap a selfie or upload an image from your photo library, and then proceed to augment your reality (or somebody else’s) with holiday visuals (Santa hat, reindeer antlers, etc.) and send personalized seasons greetings. I’m biased, since I had input on this web app from Havas SF. But having developed promotions like this for other brands, I know it's an approach that can make for powerful experiential marketing.

 

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2015 Mobile Marketing Predictions—from 2005: The Internet of Everything

Unbound_screen

Let's just say I was into the "Internet of Things" before it was much of "a thing" at all.

Never mind that a survey this year finds 87% of consumers say they've never heard the term. In my 2005 book BRANDING UNBOUND, I wrote extensively about the Internet of Things (or, IoT), and such coming innovations as "smart clothes" that would one day routinely monitor heart patients and alert doctors of impending heart attacks.

And intelligent homes, buildings and stores that will react to, and even predict, your every command—setting temperatures and lighting to your liking, and offering up goods and services based on your personal preferences.

Then there was the personalized content streamed direct to your car. Designer clothes that tell the washing machine, "don't wash me, I'm dry clean only." Medicines that warn users of dangerous interactions. Cars that get "upgrades" remotely via mobile software. And frozen dinners that tell the microwave oven how to cook them to perfection.

Nest, Tesla, Pandora, Proteus Digital Health's "smart pill," the Apple Watch and the Polo Tech Shirt notwithstanding, this world of pervasively interconnected services and solutions remains in its earliest stages. And yet, as far as the brand experience goes for these companies and others, it is beginning to create meaningful differentiation that is shaping consumer expectations with each new day.

SMART START

When Tesla recently faced a recall nearly 30,000 Model S cars because of overheating issues with their wall chargers, the company was able to fix the issue by simply update the software in each care remotely, eliminating the problem without owners needing to go to their dealerships. What have other car brands have to compete with that?

While not quite proactively ordering new supplies, Amazon's Dash devices, WalMart's Hiku roll out this week, and Red Tomato Pizza's refrigerator magnets mean all you have to do is push a button or swipe an empty container to have laundry detergent, groceries (or piping hot Pepperoni Pizza) heading your way, without ever having to take out your mobile phone, activate an app and enter an order.

Netflix even recently released DIY instructions for building a push button that dims your lights, orders food, silences the phone and fires up Netflix queue.

Factor in product innovations—such as the Nike+ Running System (which runners found so compelling that the brand's already enviable share of the running shoe category skyrocketed from 48% to 61% in its first 36 months); Prada's continuing refinement of retail technologies (which identify what garments you pick up and instantly showcase runway video and accessories on the nearest store display); or new Johnnie Walker bottles that let you create personalized gifting experiences, and interact with brand promotions, using your mobile phone—and it's easy to see that brands that leverage IoT technologies stand to benefit mightily while those that don't may fall evermore behind.

At stake—a slice of a market expected to top $1.7 trillion dollars in value by 2020, according to IDC.

Yet even big winners will need to tread carefully.

LIFE AS A POP-UP AD?

Even back in 2005, I warned that interconnected everything means you can run, but never truly hide.

Or, as techno-anthropologist Howard Rheingold tells me in the book, "A world in which you are connected infinitely is a world in which you are surveilled infinitely."

Yes, online ads and street side billboards that call out to you on a first name basis, offering exactly what you're looking for—even before you realize you're looking for it—will have their place. Much of this will seem quite magical—at rightly so. But brands and media partners must be careful to resist the temptation to personalize pitches to the point of creeping consumers out.

Or putting them in danger.

One need not look beyond recent news reports on automobile software systems being hacked from afar to understand personal information is not the only thing put at potential risk in this interconnected world.

As I write in the book, as marketers (and as consumers), you and I will face decisions our predecessors could never imagine about what is acceptable—perhaps even moral—when anything and everything is possible.

As brands we exist to serve our customers and their needs, not the other way around.

Ultimately, that may mean recognizing that consumers should be able to control how "smart" they want their "smart products"—and advertising aimed at selling them those products—to be.

Perhaps they even need control over deciding which "Things" (and the associated data) that they want to be part of this "Internet of" —to better serve them, in the ways they want to be served—even if that sometimes means less, instead of more, of what we hope to sell to them. Even while making what we do sell them more profitable.

The brands that get this balance just right will not only attract consumers. They'll gain their loyalty and their trust.

Perhaps that's where the true power of the IoT is waiting to be found.

READ MORE FROM THE '2015 MOBILE MARKETING PREDICTIONS—FROM 2005' SERIES:

PART 1: A BOOM WITH A VIEW: WEARABLES

PART 2: REACH OUT & SELL SOMEONE: MOBILE ADVERTISING

PART 3: SHOPPING FOR INSIGHTS ON THE MOBILE FRONTIER: MOBILE AT RETAIL


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2015 Mobile Marketing Predictions—From 2005: Mobile at Retail

M_branding_unbound_capture

What a difference a decade makes.

Two years before the launch of Apple's iPhone, my book BRANDING UNBOUND ventured forward to explore the future of advertising, sales and the brand experience in the mobile age.

Excerpted in ADWEEK, the book generated a lot of attention for envisioning a world of games, music, video, shopping and more via the device in the hands of virtually every man, woman and child.

Looking back now, it's fun to see what I got right—and where I went laughably wrong.

SHOPPING FOR INSIGHTS FROM THE MOBILE FRONTIER

I recently found myself chuckling about how I predicted Apple would indeed create a mobile phone, and by 2010 potentially go onto become a MVNO - a mobile virtual network operator - piggybacking on say, AT&T's network to offer its own branded Apple mobile service.

As it turned out, it was August 2015 before news reports surfaced about potential plans for an Apple-branded service in Europe (a rumor Apple quickly denied).

Hey, playing marketing futurist isn't a certain proposition.

But long before you could name the topic and rest assured that "yes, there's an app for that," I wrote about the potential for m-wallets that enable you to purchase goods in physical world stores and have it charged to a prepaid account, a credit card, or as a debit on your phone bill. And I talked about how one day, we would walk into stores, scan product tags to place a purchase, and then simply walk out the door without ever digging for cash, swiping a card, writing a check—or ever again standing in line.

To be fair, a lot of this was already in its early stages in other countries and only seemed impossible (or improbable) in the US because of a lack of standards and interoperable mobile networks. But that day did indeed come, even if some of these capabilities are still in their early stages.

MOBILE EVERYTHING

Looking ahead, I also write about how by 2015, services deployed over mobile networks will wake you up in the morning; deliver email; enable you to schedule and reschedule your day based on real-time traffic patterns, travel plans, unexpected meetings, and more. You'll buy plane tickets on the go. You'll call up news, entertainment, and shopping content—anywhere, anytime. And everyday consumers will gravitate toward solutions "that make their lives easier and help them do the things they already do easier and faster, whether it's staying in touch with friends, capturing life's moments, listening to music, or playing games."

For marketers, this would mean location-enabled, or place-based, personalized advertising that calls up "relevant offers based on personal buying behavior"—in-store or on the go.

To be sure, much of what I write about has yet to be realized—like product innovations such as RFID-like tags on frozen foods that tell the microwave oven how to cook them to perfection, or coffee machines that serve up the perfect brew based on instructions from tags placed on the bean packaging. But it is amazing to look back now at how so much of what seemed fantastic at the time has become part of our everyday lives.

That last part about product innovation is more about the Internet of Things, which I write about extensively in the book. We'll save that topic for a later installment in this series.

In the meantime, you might enjoy reading about what I got right and wrong on wearable technology (let's just say I was bullish on what Google Glass would one day seek to accomplish) and mobile advertising (I predicted the current state of mobile advertising, but thought it would progress to its next, far more powerful stage by now). 

One thing is for sure: Here in the last few months of 2015, innovative retailers and pure-play digital competitors are using the mobile channel to actively reshape what it means to shop in the twenty-first century.

Which means if you're not already into mobile-enabled retailing, don't worry.

It's already on its way to you.

ALSO READ:

PART 1: A BOOM WITH A VIEW: WEARABLES

 PART 2: REACH OUT & SELL SOMEONE: MOBILE ADVERTISING


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WENDY'S SECRET INGREDIENT: CONSUMER TECHNOLOGY

 

Turns out there's something even cooler than Wendy's supremely appealing spokesperson Morgan Smith Goodwin (above).

Word is out that the fast fooder has opened up an innovation lab focused on fast-tracking consumer-facing tech and experiences, with an emphasis on all things mobile.

Never mind that it's called 90-Degree Labs - 160 degrees is the minimum safe cooking for ground beef - it sounds like a smart initiative.

Read more here (via Digiday)

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Q&A: Go2's Adrian Scott (Pt 2): From Here to Holograms (Video)

 

Call it "ROI at the speed of 'Like.'"

In part two of my recent conversation with Adrian Scott, head of Vancouver-based Go2 Productions, we discuss why the real power of 3D projections like the ones shown in the highlight reel above isn't the display itself—it's what you (and passersby) do with it afterward via social media.

We'll also hear about some of the emerging technologies that will see 3D projection evolve into something closer to the Star Trek Holodeck—or at least like a certain scene in another fabled space opera.

AdrianCLICK HERE TO LISTEN TO Q&A: ADRIAN SCOTT, GO2 PRODUCTIONS (PART 2)

 ALSO:

LISTEN TO PART ONE: Move Over 3D Projection, 4D Projection is Here

 

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GEN WOW AWARDS: Top 10 Best in Prankvertising 2014 (Video)

 

GenWowAwards-logo_2014Call it branded video's mischievous cousin (don't miss our Top 10 Branded Videos, too). Stuntvertising. Hell, call it whatever you like—just as long as the camera is rolling as you punk one of your customers so other people can laugh at them.

Best known as "prankvertising," this technique combines physical-world antics and digital-age magic to astonish those who see it live, and delight the many (many) more who will view videos of the shenanigans online.

Despite the high risk and low advisability, prankertising has been all the rage the last few years, and this last year was no exception.

While none of this year's efforts topped the "Carrie" remake-inspired telekinetic coffee house rampage Sony pulled off in one of last year's GEN WOW AWARD winners (Check out my iMedia piece "3 Secrets to Powerhouse 'Prankvertising'"from last January), pranks were plentiful in 2014. 

Here are 10 of our favorites. Enjoy—and let us know what pranks made your list this year.

'DEVIL'S DUE': DEVIL BABY ATTACK

This promo from last January, for the film 'The Devil's Due," which looked to be a modern take on "Rosemary's Baby" delivers. In fact, it follows all of my three tenants for powerhouse prankvertising. Hell ... er, we mean WELL played, Damien, well played. Bottom line: It would have scared the crud out of me. How about you?

PEPSI MAX AUGMENTED REALITY BUS SHELTER

Pepsi pilfers a page from LG and takes it to the MAX with this fun bus shelter prank in London. Meant to give commuters an unbelievable moment, the bus shelter is also a kind of prankvertisement in that it's meant to shock and surprise while it simultaneously delights. We do wonder about the specific demographics for this initiative - we'd have to see central London bus ridership statistics - but on its face, this looks to be a fun way to build some serious buzz.

DOVE: 'BEAUTY PATCH'

This little prank may be the one blemish associated with Dove's decade long "Campaign for Real Beauty." Longtime readers know I'm a big fan of the decade-long campaign, having written extensively about the program's efforts to boost women's self-esteem and perceptions of beauty in my book THE ON-DEMAND BRAND. And I frequently cover updates to the campaign here at GEN WOW – most recently with the outstanding "Beauty Sketches" effort. But while I know "Real Beauty" has always had detractors, "Patches" is the first time I've actually seen press coverage of a blowback. What's your view?

'WALKING DEAD': BUS SHELTER

Dead man freaking: What is it with bus shelters in 2014? Here's more augmented mayhem, this time for SKY TV's "Walking Dead." The only thing that would have been better is for one of the zombies to be a real actor instead of AR, bursting around the front of the bus shelter. Hershey squirts all around.

'WALKING DEAD': NYC

Not to be undead, we mean undone, AMC went the "live" actor route in NYC—and scared the bejesus out of plenty of passersby. And that's saying something in this town.

HEAD & SHOULDERS: 'DREAM DATE WITH DANDRUFF'

This Head & Shoulders promotion pulls a hidden camera fast one on young men out on a first date with what can only be described as the doyenne of dandruff, judging from the flakes falling from her head. Kudos are deserved, however. From all appearances, the guys acquit themselves well.

COCA-COLA: 'HAVE A COKE AND A SHHH'

Coca-Cola did movie lovers everywhere a favor by inserting audience members into films to squash noise. Now if only Coke could help theaters find something less grating to hear as popcorn. A nice reminder to kindly shut the hell up.

MCDONALD'S: 'BIG MAC MIND TESTS'

Even Ronald McDonald has decided to play some pranks, here by way of mind games on passersby who are asked to snap a photo of a couple. A poster of a Big Mac is carried past them to cause a distraction while the female half of our couple switches places with another person. Will the unsuspecting dupe even notice?

FORD: HALLOWEEN CAR WASH

In 2014, even local car dealerships got into prankvertising. This treat of a Halloween trick comes from Muzi Ford in Boston. If the screams are any indication, these cars might be in need of an inside wash and air freshener, too.

TD AMERITRADE: 'ATMS—AUTOMATED THANKING MACHINES'

Here's an approach to prankvertising you can bank on: TD Ameritrade pulls random acts of kindness for unsuspecting ATM customers. With apologies to AMEX—THIS is priceless.

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GEN WOW AWARDS: Top 10 3D Projection Experiences 2014 (Video)

 

GenWowAwards-logo_20143D projection mapping is the medium with the least exciting name and the most eye-popping impact.

Also known as "spatial augmented reality" (a much better, but equally esoteric name), projection mapping is indeed technology that makes physical objects come to life - sometimes for art, often for brand advertising, and usually to blockbuster effect.

Indeed, when done well, 3D projection mapping can be mind-blowing. No special glasses, gadgets or screens required for consumers to enjoy it. And in 2014, brands and innovators started finding all-new uses for 3D projection across a wide array of categories.

With that, here's a break down of our Top 10 favorite implementations from the year that was.

SOUTHWEST AIRLINES: BRAND RELAUNCH

We seriously dug this massive, indoor 3D projection experience for Southwest Airlines back in September. We're actually working on a very cool 3D projection project with Go2 Productions, the company behind this installation, right now (check out another project we did together, here). And even though I've enjoyed a bit of a behind the scenes look at the technology, I still get excited when I see these efforts writ large - and the impact it has on the audience.

OPEN POOL: KINECT-POWERED 3D PROJECTION FUN

This isn't a brand experience, it's an actual game that made its premiere at SXSW this year, promising to bring a whole new level of liveliness to bar room billiards everywhere.

DISPLAY MAPPER: IN-STORE  PROJECTION

Okay, so this isn't a brand implementation either - it's 3D projection write small, in the form of technology  from Display Mapper that brings the power of projection to retail displays. What might your brand do with this in-store?

DOCKYARD YOKOHAMA: SET SAIL FOR SPECTACULAR

Theater in the round goes high tech.

HARD ROCK IBIZA: FINE DINING WITH A SIDE OF 3D

From retail, we make our way to this luxury dining experience where the meals can be 2,000 a head and where the room comes to life in what is billed as "subliminal emotion" at the intersection of gastronomy and technology. Enjoy.

3D ON ICE: CANUCKS GAME OPENING

Another Go2 creation, this time from October, and the 2014/15 Canucks opening game that would do Disney's "Frozen" proud. Apparently this is a thing with hockey teams from Toronto to Tampa Bay and beyond.

BMW: DRIVING AMBITION

You get the picture - 4-door 3D projection with plenty of CPM (Coolness Per Mile). Auto brands have been doing this to introduce cars for a while now, but it still makes for a captivating showroom experience.

TOSHIBA: OZONE GENERATOR

This technology cleans water or something. But the projection, the video promoting it: awesome.

COGNIZANCE 2014: GEEK CHIC

This technology festival for students, startups and technologists in India sure knows how to put on a show.

SEVILLA 2014: NAVIDAD 2014-2015: WINTER WONDER WOW

A sensational experience at the Plaza de San Francisco. Simply Amazing.

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Land Rover Rolls Out Augmented Reality to Promote Discovery Sport Ahead of Launch (Video)

 

Land Rover, Land Rover, send some coolness right over.

This augmented reality initiative enabled the auto brand to start building buzz early for the launch of its new Discovery Sport.

The pros: Very cool.Using the Durovis Dive Headset, the solution enables users to take a virtual tour of Discovery with a full-size, 3D visual experience.

The cons: You have to go into a dealer to experience it. Just think what an ad campaign using this kind of technology could be like to actually draw people into the dealer.

Still, it's surely enough to get the most enthusiastic of potential customers to Rover on over to check it out now.

Read more here.

 

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